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Lizzie Bologna Blog thought

March 17, 2009

Thanks, Rachel, for writing up the session at the Documentation centre. You made a really useful summary of our visit – and succinctly presented the essential elements of the information that we were given. (And the actual session was anything but succinct…) Great. Now I don’t have to do that. Looked at my notes on this visit but they had deteriorated into doodles. One interesting statistic that I did manage to jot down – 36% of children between the ages of 0 and 3 attend nursery in Bologna and that is the highest percentage in Italy. (There is no statutory requirement for provision for under 3s in Italy so it is the decision of the municipality.) Like you I was surprised that there was no attempt to evaluate the long term outcomes of various approaches and initiatives – and I think someone (it might have been me!) raised the matter of whether, after many years of quite strong municipal input into early years, there was an appreciable ‘difference’ (social transformation) in the wellbeing of the population – but, hey, that’s not so easy to measure…however this is an interesting issue. If one of the aims of early years education is to help to develop and foster the young child so that they can grow up into healthy and balanced adults (and the arts can play a strong role in this aim) then shouldn’t it follow that a city that focuses its resources on the very young should, in the future, reap the rewards in the way its citizens turn out? A HUGE question  and one that leads to many more.

I have just been reading through some of the information that I brought home with me and the following caught my eye. The word in Italy for creches for 0 – 3  is nido and nido means nest. The following piece was written by Marina Manferrari and Roberto Frabetti. The Italian term nido (nest) is really beautiful, maybe for its lay connotations, or maybe because it carries the concept of care and “weaning’, it also reminds us of the place from which to fly off,  from which to begin an autonomous path…

Yes, I like that term, nests.

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One comment

  1. Hi Lizzie, i am looking back on our blog reports and appreciate your ability to spell out the details and contribute theories and questions. I am finding this all very useful for my Early Years professional input.
    An ‘nest’ is the perfect term!
    Hope to see you soon,
    Rachelx



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